Anyone ready?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
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  • #2993

    Barbara G.Tarn
    Participant

    Just wondering… is anyone ready to swap a full manuscript (I’d rather not read in installments, so it’s a “crit when done” thing) or are you all swamped with WiPs at various stages?
    Also wondering… are you all aiming to be traditionally published or is there anyone daring to be indie? Just asking… 😉
    The Indie Author

    #4549

    quinnykins
    Participant

    If I can get a manuscript up to querying scratch then that, in itself, would be an achievement to me…!

    I’d love to be traditionally published as well as in Ebook form. It’s all about selling books for me and having people enjoy my writing as much as I enjoy reading other people’s. I dream of being at a book signing being the one signing the books.

    #4550

    Hermina Vass
    Participant

    Even though it’s early to talk about publishing (seeing I’m far from having a finished MS) I think the only available path for me is self-publishing (since I’m from Serbia). That is why I’m so glad that a choice like this exists. Because even people who live in the middle of nowhere (from a publisher’s PoV) can stand up and be heard by thousands of readers.

    I imagine I would have to be as successful as Amanda Hocking or John Locke to get a traditional offer. And if I am able reach such a level, I don’t think I’ll be in need of the deal. 😛

    #4551

    shakespeare
    Participant

    I’d prefer traditional publishing. I’ve self-published a regional book of real ghost stories, but I’d rather my fiction takes a traditional route.

    I do have a manuscript to tackle. It’s one I’m looking to revise completely soon, and it’s been through a ton of revisions already. I think its end is a bit rougher than I’d want–I’ve had too beta readers go through it so far, but I need a few more sets of eyes, if anybody’s willing.

    I would CERTAINLY enjoy reading someone else’s manuscript in exchange! I’m pretty reader-response with my crit, telling you what I think the reader might be thinking at a given point, or how they might react to various lines, characters, etc.

    #4552

    Chiaki
    Participant

    @Hermina: That’s true 🙂 Self-publishing is opening up a whole door of options for people who live far away today 🙂 But aren’t there any popular Serbian publishing houses?

    Once I complete my MS, I’m planning on publishing traditionally 🙂

    #4553

    Anonymous

    @cleonea (Hermina) I don’t think living in Serbia means you can’t seek traditional publishing. Granted, there’s an undeniable English-speaking slant in the publishing world, but I’ve read fantasy novels by authors from Japan, South Africa, France, and Finland — to name a few.

    That said, I’m nowhere near ready for critique, but I thought I’d chime in to say my hope is to be traditionally published.

    #4554

    Hermina Vass
    Participant

    @Chiaki and @jaimecallahan: I see what you mean and both of you are right. I could seek traditional deals with Serbian or Hungarian publishing houses (my mother’s tongue is Hungarian, I speak Serbian as environmental language), and at some point I might do that. But right now if I tried my head would probably explode.

    I read, write, learn about writing, communicate and think in English almost 24/7. Switching back to Serbian or even Hungarian is not simple at all. And one day, when I choose to take that step it won’t be for the sake of a publishing house, but for the people around me.

    Besides, I love my Kindle and I can’t wait to go down the self-publishing route. With the help of wonderful beta readers (such as yourselves), hired editors, cover designers (the investment part) etc. my stories will be worth anyone’s while. And there’s Createspace for those who like paper’s smell. 🙂

    #4555

    xaenyth
    Participant

    I *love* the smell of paper.

    My WIP is still in the first draft stage so I’m not ready to swap but hopefully it won’t be too much longer.

    I’m going to be trying traditional publishing first. My dream is to get an agent, get a great publishing deal, quit my day job and move to Australia to write until I die.

    We’ll see how much of that I get. 🙂

    #4556

    Barbara G.Tarn
    Participant

    @Hermina I started using Lulu for POD because it has European sizes and if you choose those the shipping is cheaper in Europe (my A5 books ship from France). I did a US version for the novels and it cost me a fortune to order 5 copies…
    Anyway, when you need help with Smashwords or Kindle or whatnot, you can either ask me or follow Dean Wesley Smith’s blog and workshops (I’ll be attending his next fall workshops).
    I’m Italian, and like you I’d rather write in English (although 90% of my friends don’t speak it and beg me to write in Italian again – but I know the state of the Italian publishing industry and they’re 10 years behind the US, that’s why I went indie).
    @shakespeare… should we connect, become friends and start swapping? 😉
    Thanks for all of your responses!

    #4557

    Anonymous

    I’m nowhere near ready to swap, but I did want to chime in. I’d like to try traditional publishing first and then if that doesn’t work out, try my hand at self-publishing.

    #4558

    Jani
    Participant

    It saddens me that I will never be able to publish my work through a local, South African, publisher. The reason for this is because South African publishers don’t publish works that isn’t set locally, at least not that I know of. So basically if it doesn’t contain South African or African elements, they won’t even consider it. Never mind 10 years, our publishers are about 50 years behind.
    I’m going to try the traditional rout but that’s still a long way away.

    #4559

    elizabeth
    Participant

    It’s really interesting to me that there are a lot of people out there who write mostly in English but speak another language at home. As an American who speaks English and a tiny bit of Spanish, it blows my mind. I have a friend who lives in Germany and she’s in the same boat. She writes and reads 100% in English so she finds people outside her friends at home to critique for her.

    I know she’s planning on going the traditional route because now with the power of the Internet, it doesn’t matter what part of the globe you’re from. You can still get an agent and if you’re writing in English, all the better.

    Not that I think all books should written in English of course! But if you’re shooting for that audience, it helps that you know the language.

    Personally, I am planning on going the tradition route and trying to get an agent, get a publishing deal, and sell to bookstores. Mostly because I really want to see my books on shelves, and I think having an agent will help my career decisions.

    But I love having the self-pub option too. I plan to self-pub some of my weirder ideas, or a fantasy series to ensure I get to write all of the books as they were meant to be written, instead of the publisher canceling the series on me mid-book.

    #4560

    elizabeth
    Participant

    Oh yeah. Whoops. The topic of the thread!

    I am not ready to swap yet. I have to run my book through an extreme revision before I can send it to betas, but I thought I would find critique partners now, and get a nice relationship going with them first. 😀

    #4561

    emilys
    Participant

    My book’s not finished, but I’d be happy to read and critique for someone else. My one beta partner is busy working on her WIP and sometimes I need something other than my own WIP to focus on.

    As for publishing. I would probably go the traditional route. I’m not in a hurry to get published so I can wait until the right opportunity comes along.

    #4562

    kimberlyfdr
    Participant

    I want to traditionally publish, which means my next step is to find an agent for my completed manuscript.

    My novel is in its third complete draft (fifth in parts!) and the first five chapters have been reviewed by Book Country, the first two by my critique group, and the first chapter is currently being critiqued by an agent. However, I’d love to have someone look over the complete manuscript and critique.

    My current revision is working on pacing, since that was an issue brought up by the previous reader. My goal is to get a version I’m happy with by Sunday so that I can submit to another agent-run contest on Monday (cross my fingers!)

    My plan is to hopefully get my final draft revisions done this month so that I can start querying agents late next month, so I’ll take all the critique notes i can get!

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