Pacing

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #3067

    xaenyth
    Participant

    I’m in pacing hell right now. In the first version, my story ran along way too quickly. In the rewrites, I’m trying to slow it down, but I’m getting feedback that the story is going to slow and falling flat now.

    I’m so lost.

    Does anyone have any good advice about pacing or a link you can point me in the direction of?

    You’d be my hero.

    #5118

    Anonymous

    Hi Celeste,
    Just wondering — are these the same people reading both versions, or different people?

    London

    #5119

    jenny
    Participant

    Well, there’s this article for action and dialogue scenes: http://hollylisle.com/pacing-dialogue-and-action-scenes-your-story-at-your-speed/. But I’m not sure that’s addressing the issue. Is the problem that the story is reading too fast/slow, or that the actual action or lack thereof is too thick/thin?

    #5120

    xaenyth
    Participant

    @london – The same person read both versions.

    @jenny – Thanks for the link.

    The first version dropped right into the action and kept on going and going and going. :/ There was no stopping to breathe so I tried to fix that in this version by drawing it out more, but the scenes I added didn’t move the story forward the way I wanted and slowed it down in a bad way instead.

    So now I’m kind of confused.

    Is there a way to be able to tell for yourself if your pacing is off or do you think that’s something you can only really know by letting other people read it?

    #5121

    annsquared
    Participant

    Maybe it’s not a pacing issue. Hard to tell without reading it, but if slowing it down is causing complaints, your initial pacing might’ve been right. Maybe you just need a sub-plot, or another complication that draws out the time from problem to resolution, but keeps with the pace of what you had originally. Just a thought!

    #5122

    Chiaki
    Participant

    Maybe you should take out some scenes instead of adding new ones. And be sure to give your characters a break once in a while ^_^ But to make sure your story doesn’t fall flat, keep the tension in the “break” scenes. Discretly remind readers of a pending threat. For example, instead of just having your characters sit down and drink coffee, maybe make one of them glance over her shoulder every so often to make sure she’s not being followed or overheard or something 😛

    #5123

    xaenyth
    Participant

    Hmm. Maybe that’s what it is Chiaki. I need to figure out what to put in break scenes. I definitely think that’s an issue for me.

    I have a great crit partner whose writing is a lot better than mine. She’s really helped me grow and has some serious freaking patience. (lol) But she’s really busy and I hate to ask her for too much help so I came here instead. 🙂

    *strangles the break scene*

    #5124

    Chiaki
    Participant

    She sounds like an epic crit partner O_O Your friend should be on LWC so I have another person to bother 😛

    I’m glad I was helpful 😀 *disappears into thin air*

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.