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Women's Fiction Set in Contemporary South Korea Critique

Home / Forums / List of Forums / Writers Coffee Shop / Women's Fiction Set in Contemporary South Korea Critique

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  • #6827

    racheludin
    Participant

    Bak Eun Jeong, former Little Princess of South Korea, tried to commit suicide.

    She failed.

    Five years later she is ready to try to take Korea by storm again, and reclaim her life as a Hallyu star. The crazy shooting schedules are sure to exacerbate her anxiety and depression, but acting is the only thing that she’s ever loved. She made a deal with her mom that she would only stay for a year, and if she could not support herself or she had worse mental health problems, she would return to the US.

    However, South Korea is not so forgiving of mental health issues and not everyone is so ready to forgive Eun Jeong for what happened five years ago. Someone is actively blocking her from getting work by disclosing her mental health problems and reminding the industry professionals of her public mental break down.

    If she wants to succeed, she needs to find out who this person is, if she want to reclaim where she was before her public breakdown.

    Rose of Sharon is a 107,000-word Women’s Novel.

    Novel is completed.

    Don’t worry, there are no old diners, ranches, movie studios or restaurants to save. It’s not like a typical Hallmark or Lifetime movie. I’m also Korean, so don’t worry about fetishizing the country or gross errors either. I need a plot maven to smash out 7,000 words, that’s it. I’ve been published before so there shouldn’t be too many weird errors.

    I like to swap with people who write diversity and hopefully well, including agency, etc.

    #6834

    jenny
    Participant

    If you’re still looking for a reader, I totally want to read this book. 🙂 It’s not what I write (mostly SF/F), but it sounds great (and I’m half-Korean, and want to write about dokkaebi, but I haven’t figured out how yet). One of the few parts I like about revising is figuring out how to move pieces together more efficiently, so I think I should be able to help reduce.

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